Meet EdPuzzle, My New Best Friend

This is for my teacher friends who run a flipped classroom. For those who haven’t already met him, I’d like to introduce you to…(drumroll) EdPuzzle. This little sucker is going to make your flipped classroom life easier and further engage your students.

EDPuzzle

With EdPuzzle, you can make your flip videos interactive. It’s similar to Socrative in that results are recorded in real-time and reports are produced for teacher review, making it easy to evaluate how students are performing and limiting the time you take to grade or review flip video answers with students.

During my preps, I typically look through my students’ notebooks, checking over their flip homework, checking for understanding so I know where I should pick up with our next lesson. I’m looking to see if there are common misunderstanding; do I need to review or reteach the material, or are we ready to push right along? In Math, I’m the teacher who never sits down and is constantly checking over student work as they complete independent problems. THIS, EdPuzzle, frees this time for me. Now, I can spend more time with the students who need it. As students complete their work and receive immediate feedback, I have more time to reteach or engage those who need additional instruction. The EdPuzzle analytics allow me to review student progress on my computer so I can quickly and easily see who needs this time. It’s beautiful.

Here is a short and basic video that shows how an EdPuzzle video works and looks to students.

Here’s what you need to know.

Teacher benefits:

  1. You can turn any video into your own flip. You can use resources from others that have been posted to YouTube and the like, or you can upload videos of your own.
  2. You can prevent skipping. The analytics show a completion percentage, so you know who completed the full assignment.
  3. Like Edmodo, you can add a due date to assignments.
  4. You can embed questions throughout the video. The video pauses automatically and moves forward only when students respond. THIS is gold!
  5. You can provide feedback responses to show after a student has submitted an answer so they receive immediate feedback. I like that when I require students to submit answers to open-ended questions, they can see the correct answer immediately after along with an explanation if I choose to include one.
  6. A report is produced that shows completion, grade, and turn-in date. Multiple choice questions are graded for you. Grading open-ended questions is easy, simply check whether is was answered correctly or not and EdPuzzle will calculate the overall correct percentage.
  7. Grades are given as percentages out of 100, not letter grades.
  8. You can add a comment to a students answer. I use this to clarify a misunderstanding, give tips or provide encouragement.

My students are begging me to put all our math assignments on EdPuzzle because they love it so much. The immediate feedback is invaluable. Not only does it help them stay on task, but it is motivating. This is a tool that I plan to use frequently in math. If you’re flipping any subject, I strongly urge you to give this tool a try.

Here is the EdPuzzle promo video that gives a short overview.


I’m by no means an EdPuzzle pro, but if you have any questions about how to use it, feel free to comment and I’ll respond. Also, if you have a helpful EdPuzzle tip or success story, I’d love to hear it!

Explore the Genius of Dr. Seuss This Read Across America Day – A Dr. Seuss WebQuest

Last year hundreds of students used the Dr. Seuss WebQuest I created for Read Across America Day. I posted this WebQuest on the blog for the same reason I post everything else – I hoped someone besides myself and my class could utilize my work. Well, I’ve been blown away by its popularity, and I’ve updated it so that it can be better utilized by teachers and classes outside of my own.

I’ve received over 300 survey submissions, and it’s been on my to-do list for quite some time to update the webquest to include survey results, making it more engaging and fun. I finally had time to do so this week. Now, when you submit a survey, you’re led to a results page. Also, since last year, a few links have gone by the wayside. They’ve either been replaced or removed, so everything is fully functioning and ready to go for this year’s Read Across America Day.

It’s time for your class to complete the Dr. Seuss WebQuest (pictured below) and get to know the writer, poet and cartoonist known as Dr. Seuss better than ever. They will explore his books and characters, and even create a Dr. Seuss inspired character of their own! Click HERE to begin.

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Purpose: Students complete a WebQuest to learn more about Dr. Seuss and his books. They then use this to inspire them to create their own Dr. Suess characters. This WebQuest is motivating to students as it allows students to explore and learn at their own pace.

Objectives:

  • Students will use online resources to learn about Theodor Seuss Geisel, the writer, poet and cartoonist known as Dr. Seuss.
  • Students will explore books written by Dr. Seuss, discovering new books and reflecting on personal favorites.
  • Students will create their own imaginative Dr. Seuss inspired character.
  • Students exercise technology skills to compile learned information in a Microsoft Word document. Students will: create a bulleted list, insert a table, use shading to fill table background, use text alignment tools and insert headers.

13 Colony Reports

Mr. Robert James, a 5th grade teacher in PA, created a solid colonial brochure project for his class and posted the guidelines along with the rubrics he uses on his class Google site. I came across his site when I started teaching 5th grade a few years ago, and I’ve been doing this project with my class since. My kiddos create a brochure, just as outlined by Mr. James for his class. The students are then able to dress up as the governor of their colonies as they present a speech to convince the parent and student audience to settle in their colony.

I’m sure I’m not the only one who will find Mr. James’s project outline helpful, so I provided links to the resources I use for my class’s 13 Colony Report below. As mentioned, the guidelines and brochure rubric are credited to Robert James. You can view his website here. I use his wording in the overview I created for my class. You will find my overview along with links to Mr. James’s overview and scripted notes below. I also provided a link to a Weebly of approved websites I designed to help students when researching.  Last, I included a video I created a few years ago to explain the project to my class while I had a substitute. I then decided to share the video with parents since it provided an overview of the project, and they found it very helpful. I now share this video with parents each year.

13 Colony Websites

Mrs. Caso’s 13 Colony Weebly  – created to help students research online

Assignment Overview, Guidelines and Rubric

Original Guidelines and Rubrics (created by Robert James) – I plan to use the feedback form on the last page this year.

Scripted Notes (created by Robert James)